Loading... Please wait...

Our Newsletter

Subscribe and get free
expedited shipping:


Movies that are great in 3D

 Ever since Clash of the Titans and Wrath of the Titans failed to deliver big box office returns, movie studios have tried an alternate approach.  Instead of making cheap thrill movies with a 3D gimmick sprinkled in, filmmakers are finally being given the freedom to use 3D as it was intended.  Not as a gimmick, but as a story telling tool.  Tekspree.com  has always argued that 3D has to be used to express the filmmakers story  - not to make movie-goers swat at 3D flies and duck careening shrapnel.

To our case against those that think 3D is doomed to be the tool of the outrageous summer blockbuster, we've put together a list of 5 movies  (old and new) that are even better in 3D.  No cheesy gimmicks here - just great cinematography.

3D LG Shutter Glasses.jpg

1) House of Wax

The first movie on our list actually appears on Martin Scorsese's list of 85 films you need to see to know anything about film.  House of Wax was released in 1953 and was one of the first big 3D movies.  According to Scorsese, what made the 3D  so integral to the story was the dynamism it added to the already energetic camera work. 

dialmformurder.jpg

2) Dial M for Murder
Alfred Hitchcock was well known for using innovative filming techniques for his movies. In 1954 he gave 3D a shot  with his thriller Dial "M" for Murder.   Now-a-days most people remember the movie as being in 2D, but when it was originally released, the film was played in 3D (which is also how it was originally shot). 

us-in-3d.jpg

3) U2 in 3D

Actually, this U2 concert was one of many concerts that were shot in 3D. Many of them were actually screened in movie theaters. Even if you could not make the live concert, seeing it on the big screen in high definition 3D was almost as good!  In fact, it may be better because you can get closer to the action  than you would in a 30,000 person arena!

cave-of-forgotten-dreams-3d.jpg

4)  Cave of Forgotten Dreams

This documentary by Werner Herzog uses 3D to emerse the viwers in southern France's Chauvet Cave - a setting untouched by man for thousands of years and containing the earliest known cave paintings.  3D  in documentaries is a very powerful tool  as it can give a depth of vision  regular cameras miss.

huge-3d.jpg

5)  Hugo

In this  imagined world created by Martni Scorsese, the story of early film making is told.   There is even a reenactment of the first audiences to see the motion picture of a train entering a station - which they leaped away from, afraid that the train would hit them.  Scorsese's film have always aimed for that type of audience interaction, and using 3D enabled him to get  it.  Watching Hugo in 3D  transports you to  a world where wind up toys can stir the imagination, and the very first movies were made.   This is the type of immersion that only few movies, Hugo and Avatar included, are capable of.



blog comments powered by Disqus